Categories
Scientific News

An observatory that will allow us to study primordial universe has nearly been completed

Only one last piece is missing to complete the new Simons astronomical observatory, a telescope that will be used to obtain new information on the formation of the universe and its origins.

Engineers, technicians and scientists are making the final touches to the LATR (Large Aperture Telescope Receiver), one of the most important pieces, considered the central detector as well as the “heart” of the entire observatory.

The observatory Simons will rely on a series of telescopes placed in Atacama desert, Chile, and will be used in particular to study deeper into the cosmic microwave background radiation, ie the residual radiation left by the big bang, a group of waves very weak important to know the first moments of the universe.

This is a very weak signal that can be easily disturbed by any “background noise.” Precisely to avoid this disturbance, the LATR detector will operate at very low temperatures, even at absolute zero, a temperature that can only be obtained through cryogenic techniques. This is why the engineers have designed a massive metal shell that will house this central detector.

This is the largest experiment aimed at studying the cosmic ground-based radiation ever made (thus not considering orbiting telescopes), an experiment that can count on sensitivity at least 10 times higher than any other study of this radiation.

The observatory should gather the first data in the spring of 2021.